BL: The Solution to College Football Attendance Woes? … “cheap beer” ??

    College Football
    BobLee
    April08/ 2018

    BL:  Solution to College FB attendance woes… “cheap beer”?

    I LOVE this subject – Diminishing on-site attendance for College Football. The issue has several components that I count among my most favorite… (1) Every fan has his/her opinion… (2) So-called “experts” are finally admitting they don’t have a clue… (3) Cultural evolution, like water and cockroaches, will ALWAYS triumph.

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    NOTE: Alas, I have to do something here that I rarely, if ever, do. I must post an entire article that appeared this week in The Athletic. The Athletic.com is my #1 source for “sportswriting”. It is a subscription-only site ($45/year) with no ads… no pop-ups… no auto-audio; and for the most part, real sportswriters and not glorified post-pubescent board monkeys who work cheap. If I simply post the link, you can’t access it unless you are a subscriber. The article will appear after my own incredibly insightful comments…

    Among the ever-how-many “institutions” there are today in The ACC – is ND in or out or what – only three seem, so far, unaffected by the nation-wide trend in diminished on-site attendance for College Football. Those three are Clemson – Virginia Tech – and NC State University.

    Clemson – with a very long tradition of “a rabidly loyal fan base”, has become a legitimate annual Super Power in the Dabo Era.

    VaTech has not achieved Clemson’s status but did, in The Era of Beamer, become an annual Top Fifteen or better FB program. Indications are the new Coach Whatshisname is continuing that same level of success. Or maybe it is all due to Bud Foster?

    NC State’s current “fill the stadium” success is less easy to categorize. Decades of being “a 5 or 6” level on-field program on a scale of “10” is now on track to be a legitimate 7-8 and, if everything goes perfectly, maybe even “a 9”. A coaching change could set all that back of course.

    Regardless, State fans are, for the past several years, filling Carter-Finley on a consistent level to be envied by the many institutions who will NEVER be able to say that ever again. An ideal tailgating environment, in my opinion, plays a large part in Gameday @ The Fairgrounds.

    The other ACC programs, even Florida State, are all seeing “empty seats” they have not seen in decades. If new FSU coach Taggert can immediately “wake up the Bowden echoes”, FSU can refill those seats.

    UNCCH is, of course, reducing its number of empty seats “amid Kenan’s lofty pines” by simply Kenan seatseliminating 10,000 seats. Replacing bleacher seats with individual chair seats is a wise decision increasing the comfort factor of its core fan base and admitting “growing that base” is unrealistic. “Empty seats” in 2015 when Larry Fedora fielded an offensive juggernaut that was capable of (but fell short) winning The Swofford Bowl was proof to UNCCH’s sportsmarketers that win / lose / rain / shine / noon / 3:00 PM there are only 45-50,000 UNC FB fans maximum interested in trekking “amid those pines” on Autumn Saturdays… with / without a $32,000,000 IPF.

    Paraphrasing the words of Homicide Detective Harry Callahan… “a College Football program gots to know its limitations…”

    Nationally, there are only a handful of premier programs unaffected by this socio-cultural trend. That handful will likely grow smaller in coming years.

    This “trend” in College Football was first noticed 5-6 years ago… but went “Tsunamic” the past 2-3 years.

    Fingers have been pointed every which-a-way at all sorts of “whys”. To date “Donald Trump” and “The NRA” have NOT been accused but that is simply a matter of time.

    My favorite ludicrous reason was “students are too hung over to get up for a noon kick-off”. For 50+ years, all kick-offs were at 1:00 PM and students “got up” early enough to actually “dress up” and pick-up dates at assorted regional institutions.

    “Not good enough Wi-Fi” prompted some institutions to upgrade their stadium Wi-Fi. How one “upgrades stadium Wi-Fi” is a mystery to me, but so is “electricity” and “Oprah’s popularity”. Upgrading Wi-Fi had zero effect on diminishing attendance.

    Now the most popular logical “why” is “every game is televised”HDTVs are so good (and great graphics, replays, etc) that stadiums cannot compete for comfort, convenience and value.

    I saw this coming and am on-record saying when “large flat-screens became easily affordable (under $1,000)” the battle was lost.

    Institutions, of course, make millions $$$ from TV rights so the popularity of the sport is not the issue. As The Athletic article suggests… schools might be advised to go the UNCCH route and concentrate on holding on to their core fan base… not wasting marketing resources beyond that.

    The final alternative as noted at the end of the article is …. “cheap beer”. That has always been on some lists but never on mine.

    I can make a 6-pak last well over a year or more. “Free beer” won’t lure me… in fact, the mere thought of being surrounded by “a drunken mob” would further keep me from even considering “going to a game”.

    What’s next… “skimpier cheerleader uniforms” ???

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    .

    Books CornerGREAT “Listens” lately… I’m continuing to churn out 2-3 audiobooks/week. I noted the latest CJ Box – Joe Pickett Adventure last week.

    This week I added The Outlaw Platoon by Sean Parnell – a true account of an Army Ranger Platoon’s 16 months at an FOB (Forward Operating Base) in Afghanistan in 2006. This is not a Hollywood-ized account. Real people die because of incompetence and because that’s what happens in War…

    Just finished The Ghost of Cannae (Can-nay) by Robert O’Connell. Cannae was The key battle in the 2nd Punic War between Hannibal’s Carthage and Rome in 216 BC. Hannibal, one of history’s greatest military tacticians, won at Cannae despite being greatly outnumbered… but would lose the war. I have read several books on Hannibal.

    Gettysburg dead = 46,000…. Waterloo dead = 26,000… Cannae dead = 87,000 !!!  Next time you are in a full Carter-Finley, imagine that many people plus dying on one battlefield on one day !!! … 95% by hand-to-hand combat with swords and spears.

    When most folks think of Rome, they think of Julius Caesar. The Battle of Cannae was 100 years before Julius Caesar was born…

    How did people refer to time / years in BC? The “modern” baseline for counting years had not been established (Jesus’ Birth)… so what “year” was it?

    ###

    .

    That promised article from The Athletic… several UNCCH professors are quoted.

    Coming to grips with college football’s declining attendance

    By Michael Weinreb Apr 6, 2018 78

    Forty years ago, in the fall of 1978, a husband and wife purchased a pair of season tickets for a major college football program. The school in question had expanded its stadium capacity from 61,000 to 77,000. It was, at that moment, the eighth-largest college football stadium in the country. The couple did not have to pay any sort of seat-license fee or join a booster club to purchase tickets, as they would today, and though they cannot remember how much they paid, the face value on tickets at that point was somewhere between $5 and $10.

    This year, that couple — who happen to be my mother and father (a Penn State professor, no less) — chose, for the first time since, not to renew their season tickets for Nittany Lions football. They made this decision for a number of reasons, but in large part, it came down to this: It was often easier and more enjoyable not to go to a game than it was to attend.

    The stadium capacity has increased from 77,000 (which wouldn’t even land among the top 20 largest of today) to nearly 107,000, and the majority of the seats — at least until planned renovations are completed — are still stiff metal bleachers painted with numbers that are barely spaced wide enough to fit an actual human body.

    The start times of games often slingshot between noon and 8 p.m. on the whim of the television networks, and the price of tickets has increased far faster than the rate of inflation. Often, at least two of those early-season games are scheduled against Group of 5 teams that are essentially being paid to serve as glorified scrimmage partners.

    All of that made it more of a hassle than it was worth for my parents. And though they might be an exception to the rule at a competitively ascendant program like Penn State, their decision is far from unique: As reported by CBS Sports’ Dennis Dodd, FBS attendance decreased by an average of 1,409 fans per game last season, the largest drop in 34 years. Attendance fell in every Power 5 conference except the Big Ten (which increased by 76 fans, or .01 percent), and attendance in the SEC, generally viewed as the beating heart of the college football universe, dropped the most, by 3.14 percent. (For more attendance figures from the NCAA, click here.)

    There are a million theories as to why this happening, and some of those theories, with the benefit of additional research, will no doubt prove to be valid. And some of those theories will prove to be based on false assumptions. Obviously, winning and losing plays a huge role, particularly at schools that don’t traditionally have football success. But underlying all these potential variables are a couple of quandaries — posed to me by experts in this field — that I had never really pondered:

    • What if college football, by nature of having the most consistently intense home-field atmosphere of any major sport, is actually alienating a segment of its potential fan base?

    • On top of that, what if college football’s two primary revenue drivers — attendance and television — are inherently structured to work against each other?

    Let’s dispel with one stereotype up front: This decrease is not taking place merely because of the inherent laziness of millennials. Yes, student attendance has decreased 9 percent since 2009, but probably not because, as one expert told Dodd, college students “no longer view attending sporting events as part of the college experience.”

    It also is not about the lack of consistent Wi-Fi coverage at stadiums. Nels Popp, an assistant professor of sport administration at the University of North Carolina, says that despite colleges’ obsession with improving Wi-Fi, connectivity is the “lowest reliable variable” when it comes to attendance. In other words: People don’t stay home because of lousy Wi-Fi, even if they consider good Wi-Fi to be a bonus when they do show up.

    “Our response when we see students aren’t coming tends to be, ‘Let’s throw more shit at them,’ ” says Robert Malekoff, Popp’s colleague in UNC’s Department of Exercise and Sport Science.

    In a way, that might be true, but it’s not about literally hurling T-shirts or network passwords in their general direction (it may not be about social media blasts, either, if Popp’s research on the lack of impact of social media on attendance bears out with further study). It’s a more subtle, experiential thing — and it might extend beyond the student body and into older generations, as well.

    One example of a potential prototype may exist in Starkville: In 2016, Popp notes, Mississippi State constructed eight luxury cabanas on the terrace of Davis Wade Stadium. The cabanas had televisions, food and shade from the heat. Each cost $18,000 per season and sold out in 48 hours — and it seems relevant to note here that the cabanas don’t have a direct view of the action on the field.

    This is an extreme example, but in a way, it comports with the decision my parents made. Now that every game is available on television, the majority of casual fans value comfort and an overarching experience, which is why UCF fans flocked to the beach cabana built at their stadium in 2015.

    Sure, I know what you’re thinking, because when I heard this, I thought the same thing: That’s idiotic. Why go to a college football game if you’re not interested in watching football? Isn’t that what sets our game apart from professional sports, where the atmosphere has long been sucked dry of any soul by television, corporate sponsorship and luxury-box culture? Aren’t we proud of the fact that college football is not as casual an experience as, say, minor league baseball? When I was a kid, we used to wait on the overcrowded ramps to get to our seats while mooing like cattle. Isn’t the inherent discomfort of attending a game part of the experience?

    But here’s what those of us who grew up as hardcore fans must come to terms with: We’re not the ones who need to be marketed to, because we’re not going anywhere.

    “I think it’s an old-school mentality, that if you come to a game you’re going to sit on the edge of your seat,” Popp says. “But this is a six-hour commitment. And I don’t think we can ask them to make the game the only draw. People want a lot of other entertainment options. The mindset of the attendee is changing.”

    There will always be a cadre of students who prefer to be crammed in tight, who prefer to paint team colors on their chests, who are too busy shouting to take note of the amenities. But those fans are going to the games, no matter what. It’s the rest of the people who make the difference between sellouts and empty sections. If they’re students, they might want to go if their friends are going or if the game feels more like a social event. If they’re adults, they might want to go if their children feel more welcome or if they have access to more comfortable seating and an experience that can compete with television.

    And that brings me to the second quandary, which is that, in a way, college football is competing against its own televised product. “They’re kind of going head-to-head,” Malekoff says. “TV is much more like the game-day experience now. There’s food. There’s a bathroom right there.”

    By shifting many kickoff times six to 12 days before the game, television has made it harder for people to plan ahead to attend. People with children may have their Saturdays scheduled around soccer games; older people might not want to drag themselves to an 8 p.m. game, and students might not want to drag themselves out of bed for a noon start against a subpar opponent. People are always going to complain about the cost, but in a way, Popp wonders, the time commitment could matter more than the monetary commitment.

    How do schools remedy all of this? First, says Malekoff, we need to find out more about the why. “Don’t just guess why fans don’t come,” he says, “Ask.”

    In that same vein, says Popp, don’t merely “crowd-blame” — look inward instead. Given the impact of television, it might be time for the schools to ask what matters more to them: maximizing revenue through television or having a full house? (This is an idea professional sports has largely come to terms with, for better or worse.)

    It’s a quandary that will take time and study to resolve, but in the meantime, says Popp, there’s at least one idea that has proved far more positive and far less destructive than administrators thought it would. And it no doubt enjoys near-universal generational acclaim.

    “Two words,” Popp says. “Cheap beer.”

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    BobLee
    • Doug Reply
      3 months ago

      “Duke and Wake would love to have 40,000.” The “Wrigley Field of college football,” BB&T Field at WF has a capacity of 31,500. But that doesn’t include the grassy knoll or the 500 -1,000 drinking cheap beer in the parking lot.

      • BobLee Reply
        3 months ago

        I’ve always had the impression that WFU fans accept the reality of the size of their fan base / alumni. That they cannot come close to filling that 35,000 is likely disconcerting but simply is reality. Same with Duke but WFU is, IMO, a better “venue” than The Wally.

    • John Reply
      3 months ago

      from Wikepedia …. 1979 .. 1 year after I graduated … but the first year I could find on the inter webs.

      Notice the attendance = 49,000 – 50,000 for the home games.

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1979_North_Carolina_Tar_Heels_football_team

      • BobLee Reply
        3 months ago

        Don’t forget “The Kirsch Factor” named for long time SID Steve Kirschner… “at the start of the 2nd Qrt make a WAG and add 5,000… always end in a round number”. There is no “official” attendance policy for NCAA members. Each institution uses their own method. Some count actual turnstiles. Others count tickets sold. Others just WAG… UNC seems to have peaked at around 50,000 prior to the current sea-change in on-site attendance that no one seems to have an answer / solution for. Duke and Wake would love to have 40,000.
        .
        No clue how Romans and Carthaginians counted their battle casualties. “Winners get to write the history books” so Hannibal gets to count Cannae… and Wellington gets Waterloo.

    • John Reply
      3 months ago

      Like sports attendance figures, I’m sure there’s a lot of SWAG in these casualty numbers. Nevertheless, if you’re going to cite figures in the articles, you might as well cite them correctly. Not a big deal.

      Back to the subject — I would note that attendance at BKS was ~ 50,000 when I attended UNC in the mid 1970’s. In the ensuing 40 years the population of NC within an hour of so of Chapel Hill has doubled and the University has graduated another 130,000 or more students. Yet attendance at BKS is still stuck at ~ 50,000.

      • BobLee Reply
        3 months ago

        Your BKS #s may be as questionable as my battle #s. The capacity of BKS was no more than 45,000 thru the 70s. Both end zones were temporary bleachers and, I believe, there was only one upper deck. Expansion began as Mack’s teams enjoyed success in the 80s. Regardless the eventual expansion to 60,000 permanent seats has rarely been filled… other than a few “hated rival” games. … But UNC “FB fan base” has always been stuck in the mid-upper 40s. … As I note, I credit NCSU’s tailgating logistics as a major benefit to their stronger attendance as the on-field products have both been about the same when compared over the past several decades.

    • John Reply
      3 months ago

      You’re confusing ‘Casualties’ with ‘Deaths’ or ‘Killed in Action’. Casualties included Killed … Wounded … Missing … and .. Captured. Gettysburg – Total Casualties = ~ 50,000 for both sides, or whom ~ 8,000 were killed.

      • BobLee Reply
        3 months ago

        How valid are any #s in such events… especially ones happening 2,200 years ago or 160 years ago ?? A LOT of men were killed, wounded or MIA in all “big battles”.

    • TheDoctor Reply
      3 months ago

      Wake Forest did indeed embrace beer sales. What they did not embrace was CHEAP beer sales. Eight to ten dollars will get me a single beer at a WFU game, or a nice six-pack at home. Guess which one I’ll pick?

      • BobLee Reply
        3 months ago

        Thanks for the info update. WFU does have a solid HC now in Dave Whatshisname… but for how long?

    • Doug Reply
      3 months ago

      Replying to NCSU68GRAD on replying to BABS-IN-DERM: Nothing like a quickie story about pre-game activities.😎

      • BobLee Reply
        3 months ago

        It was pretty much “vintage NCSU68Grad”. Bless his heart… the classic “too much information” . 🙂

    • NCSU68GRAD Reply
      3 months ago

      REPLY TO BABS-IN-DERM…
      Babs,
      You DO bring back memories. I remember some FB games where my DW (YES…we wuz married) did not arrive at the Greyhound Terminal until late morning (she caught the early bus out of G’boro as she was at UNC-G or “Women’s College” as it was known or the official designation then….how SEXIST…). Anyway, it was “First THINGS FIRST….and we renewed our marriage bonds….at least once….twice of good days. THEN, we would get dressed “PROPERLY” for the Riddick Stadium Ritual. Camel Blazer with NCSU Crest…Gray flannel (or whatever) Slacks….White button down collar shirt….and Red STRIPED (optional on the colors) ties. There weren’t NO WP Ties back then. BUT, in 1980, Jimmy V swears that Charlie Bryant gave him a WIDE TIDE with several Wolves on it. The Wolves stood on their haunches. They had NCSU red Hats on. You could read the letters NCSU at 50 yards with no visual assistance. THAT was the beginning of the “Logo Ties”. Chuckled and kidded the DW about the Riddick Ritual…..(traditional and non-traditional). She swears she was NOT involved and it NEVER happened…..Great post.

    • JD Reply
      3 months ago

      Reasons I stopped going to UNC home and road football games in no certain order. I just don’t care as much as I did 10 years ago. The people I went with stopped caring too. I hate dealing with the length of drive , the traffic, the over priced tickets, the crowd. I stopped drinking alcohol about 6 years ago. I realized I only liked going to the games for the tailgating and the drinking. Even if UNC was a juggernaut on the level of Alabama and I had free tickets I’m not sure I would go.

      • BobLee Reply
        3 months ago

        That sums up my feelings very well. It “just stopped being important to me”.

    • Robedixon Reply
      3 months ago

      Can not remember the last time I watched a college football game in person. Heck I can not remember the last time I watched or went to anything outside or lately inside that involved large crowds and the creature comfort agony that goes with such. I avoid small festivals and amusement parks too. Best now is an occasional home church or county monthly political party meeting. My wife says I am boring, I suppose that is mostly true, but I got lots of old friends who live similar type lives so..
      .
      As you know I avoid crowded beaches too. As for the NC State crowd and knowing a decent number of Pack fans seems to me they still believe that they are always one coach or several five star recruits away from being a football power of the Alabama type. I never have had the heart to pop their fantasy bubble and maybe the powers who need to fill Carter want that fantasy bubble not to be busted either.
      .
      I personally would revolt from just the cost of attending games in person. I just checked and annual attendance at Carter runs just under $400 now and that likely nose bleed seats, not to mention the silly parking pass costs, and the outrageous food costs in stadium. So maybe I am either more frugal with my cash than those Pack fans too.

      • BobLee Reply
        3 months ago

        You know I agree on all points. I don’t belittle how others prioritize their time and $$$ so long as I am left alone to prioritize my own.

    • Babs-in-Derm Reply
      3 months ago

      Ah, Harry Callahan (a.k.a. – Clint, my favorite)! Great topic. I think it hits on almost all the reasons attendance is down throughout the country. I had to laugh at the excuse of students not being able to make the 1:00 PM kickoff. Hell, students partied on home game weekends, starting on Thursday afternoons (at least the frats did). Some of them hardly made it to bed the Friday night before! Yes, we still “dressed up” and made it over in time for the game. Now, we may have been drunk again by half-time, but hey, it was football, not basketball. It was a rite of passage. I recall there were times when we didn’t even know (or care) who was winning. We just had to make it home to nap, redress, and hit the “big” party. The only day I knew that students didn’t make it out of be by Noon, if that early, was Sunday after a home game.
      .
      Times have changed, and what was once THE thing to do on a Saturday afternoon has been lost in the shuffle of EVERYTHING else to do. More options and activities. You were right about he bit screen TVs with all the conveniences of home. Let’s not forget sports bars where you can enjoy viewing games with friends and have your food and booze all in one place. Convenience has now become part of our culture, but I will say, nothing prettier than a clear, Fall afternoon at Kenan.
      .
      One thing I believe that has occurred that nobody wants to talk about is the culture of teams that has replaced what college football used to be. You know what I’m talking about, and because of it, more people just don’t want to waste hours watching what is considered “thug” ball now. I won’t elaborate.

      • BobLee Reply
        3 months ago

        The “Gladiator v Spectator Factor” doesn’t help but probably not a Top 3-4 Factor… IMO. The Cultural Techno Tsunami that has hit society the past ten years is overwhelming. The “old days” of even five years ago , much less 25, are gone forever. ADAPT/ADJUST or Perish …

    • Former96Heel Reply
      3 months ago

      Most cultural phenomenon go through a wave of popularity. Even though College FB may still be on the upswing, it’s obvious the in-person experience is post-peak. Same with Nascar, pro sports, college sports and on and on. Newspapers had their peak 80 years ago. Churches, unfortunately, had a peak popularity as well. TV news probably peaked around the outbreak of the first Gulf War, but who knows exactly when anything is at its top. It is a wonderfully odd dilemma in culture that being more popular and bringing a wider audience often kills what drew the original follower to begin with.
      .
      Too many commitments for the schools for them to try to get folks in seats. Length of gametime is a button for me. I like non-televised games in person. But is Northwestern going to run a random Rutgers game with a short halftime and no breaks at every change of possession? Heck no, the TV and conference money is what allows them to build that Lakefront IPF.

      • BobLee Reply
        3 months ago

        Excellent comparative analysis !! … 🙂

    • Old Alpha Wolf Reply
      3 months ago

      I understand the Wake Forest has adopted the Cheap Beer strategy.

      • BobLee Reply
        3 months ago

        Indeed… a year or so ago. And the result was … NADA.

    • Doug Reply
      3 months ago

      Just my opinion. The football stadium building boom started in earnest in the 1990’s. The usual suspects: Texas, The Ohio State, Michigan, Alabama etc started expanding stadiums amounting to an arms race few could afford but many schools panicked anyway. Build to keep up for the sake of keeping up with established football brands even though “your school” never was or never will be a Texas in football.
      .
      IPF’s are the new thing now. Northwestern just added – I kid you not- a glass walled lakefront IPF on the shores of Lake Michigan. An IPF right on da beach. The IPF is only the first phase of a an approved $265 million (not a typo) the lakefront Walter Athletics Center, designed to become an on-campus hub for athletics and recreation. This one might be the most absurd boondoggle. The mother of all boondoggles.
      .
      The whole expansion/IPF saga reminds one of the nuclear arms race between the USA-USSR with the latter ending up bankrupt with Ronald Regan applying the final sleeper hold on Gorbachev. And these universities, these institutions of higher learning all claim to be the smart guys. The best of the best. Among the brightest minds in the world. How dare we to question their judgment on these matters.

      • BobLee Reply
        3 months ago

        When board monkeys become Trustees (i.e. UNC’s notorious “BOT Bob” and his cronies) all is lost!

    • RowdyBlueTarHeeler Reply
      3 months ago

      well, the missus and I funded 4 football tix in the aluminum jungle for over 25 years.
      a few years ago, those wise rams decided to dun me for a 500% increase to
      retain “rights” to purchase the same seats we had filled for over 20 years.
      easy decision – bye bye rams’ club. we must not be such great fans…
      anyway, we can or not cheer for our so so program on the TV, or not…

      • BobLee Reply
        3 months ago

        UNC / Rams Club picked the absolute worse time to do the seat shuffle. They ended up running off far more than they added.

    • NCSU68Grad Reply
      3 months ago

      Apologies for the “NEW” comment as the Reply, at least in Win 10 and Edge with Norton are not resolving. Since I never watch Kimmel and only see the headlines about him and don’t read the stories, I guess that I have been stabbed. Nowhere did I mention Hannity or Melanie. BUT, you are probably correct…
      Sex Sells….and even the Miss Goodyear/Spint/Winston/Red Bull or whomever lassies that smile and get in the camera shots in the Winner’s Circles are dressing more provacatively. Fortunately a literal stab wound for a comment does not require an ER visit. Does Swoff or the NCAA get any vote (yea or nay) on X-Rated sideline eye candy?
      How are the grand babies? I went shooting yesterday and decided that an outdoor (benches covered) range was warmer and more hospitable than CF. But, I sent in a donation….

      • BobLee Reply
        3 months ago

        Twins are fine. Turned three months old this weekend. 🙂 …
        .
        The REPLY feature should be fine now ??? I never watch Kimmel or any late night show in years but did see the kerfluffle with Hannity. Serious strategy error for Hannity. Never fight on the other guy’s home turf. In Kimmel’s case that was “in the toilet”.

    • DM Carpenter Reply
      3 months ago

      Thanks for enjoy able Sunday reading. Our college football was eclipsed by the kids’ football years ago. We enjoyed watching App play in Boone, but watching the son and daughter play club football on Saturday is more enjoyable. Now, we are entering the High School period. I am excited, and looking forward to it.
      .
      Cannae, a beautifully executed double-envelopment. Commanders have dreamed about doing that since.
      .
      If you liked THE OUTLAW PLATOON, I would suggest you dig up some older books by Leonard Scott. CHARLIE MIKE and THE LAST RUN, were novels of Ranger ops in VN, excellently written. He also wrote general VN novels, THE HILL (173d ABN BDE) and THE EXPENDABLES (1t CAV DIV in the Ia Drang). Great books, well written and researched. They were also appreciated by the ‘old guys’ with whom I served, who lived it.

      • BobLee Reply
        3 months ago

        Battles like Cannae (and as portrayed in Braveheart) are unimaginable to me. To be in the midst of such carnage for several hours, how did anyone survive? Will check out your suggestions.

    • NCSU68Grad Reply
      3 months ago

      My vote is for pasties and G-strings for the cheerleaders and the pep or dance teams. Add in “stripping” routines for the marching band and you won’t have folks leaving at half time. In order to improve the flow and get more “cheerleading time”, have a mandatory 5 minute “Boobie Bouncing” mid field session after every first down. Then bring out the trampoline for every score. The cheerleader (they rotate) will get in to the trampoline with HD cameras and then bounce for every point. Reduce the game time from four 15 minute quarters to maybe 3 10 minute periods. The Hockey fans would like that as they can understand. I think that they would quickly understand the difference between “ICING” and “@$$ING”.

      • BobLee Reply
        3 months ago

        I bet Jimmy Kimmel would endorse your plan!

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