Bigger than “the Game”

    Piscotty Injury
    BobLee
    September29/ 2015

    A frightening injury to a rival player reveals the character of Pittsburgh sports fans….

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    Last night my Cardinals began a crucial series with Pittsburgh at PNC Stadium.  It was another Humdinger of a game with the valiant St Louisians prevailing 3-0 (despite the Bucs stranding over 15 runners). ….. An incident happened in the bottom of the 7th inning that overshadowed the tremendous game and said a lot about both teams, about Baseball, and about the sell-out crowd in Pittsburgh.

    Two Cardinal outfielders pursuing a long fly ball collided in Left-Center.   Centerfielder Peter Bourjos caught the ball but in the collision his knee hit the head of rookie phenom Stephen Piscotty.    Piscotty was stretched out motionless as Bourjos signaled frantically for the medical staff.

    A sold-out PNC Stadium crowd of Pirate-partisans and a national TV audience joined the players / staff of both teams in “fearing the worst” for a prolonged ten minutes.   Piscotty was obviously unconscious as Cardinal (and Pirate) medical personnel and Manager Mike Matheny huddled around him.

    The ESPN TV announcing crew was eerily quiet, not knowing any more than was obvious in the long distance camera view.   Other camera angles caught Piscotty’s teammates in their stunned emotional concern…. AND Pirate players / staff showing equal concern.

    A flatbed cart was brought out as Piscotty was placed on a spineboard and onto the flatbed. Piscotty injury  As the cart carried him off, he raised a hand to indicate to the crowd / audience that he (1) was conscious and (2) had feeling in his upper body.  The partisan crowd and Pirate team cheered the visiting “enemy” player.

    MRIs would later reveal there was no “severe” injury…. no head/neck/spine damage.   No word yet when he might return to the Cardinals already injury-depleted line-up.

    ###

    Baseball is not generally considered “a dangerous sport” as compared certainly to Football where every game seems to be “russian roulette” in terms of “somebody WILL get hurt”…. Romo, Brees, Rothleisberger, et al.

    Batters hit by pitches and pitchers hit by line drives are the two primary ever-present dangers.   But, collisions between players and opponents obviously do happen.

    What struck me last night was the immediate reaction of Pirate personnel AND the PNC crowd.   The Pirate / Cardinal divisional rivalry has been nip/tuck intense the past several years as the Bucs have emerged from decades of mediocrity to join the Cardinals as one of the 6-7 “best teams in MLB”.   But the rivalry certainly lacks the 50+ year history of Cardinals / Cubs or Yankees / Red Sox or Dodgers / Giants.

    As Piscotty was motionless on the outfield grass he was not “a Cardinal”.   He was “a baseball player” who was obviously seriously injured.

    I was NOT surprised by the concern of the Pirates’ team.  Baseball is “a Brotherhood”, not to say that other sports are not.   There is a camaraderie among competitors that does NOT require ginning up “hatred” in order to compete at the highest level.

    There was a nasty beanball brouhaha between the Cards and Cubs a week or so ago, so it does get intense; but moments like last night immediately transcend that.   At least it did last night.  If there were a few jackasses in PNC (which is likely in any crowd of 35,000 humans), they were muted.

    Would a Wrigley Field crowd have reacted like Pirate fans did?  I’d like to think they would.   I am confident that a Busch Stadium crowd would have shown similar respect to an opposing player.   They have a precedent for such politeness.  It’s a “Midwestern thing”.   I am admittedly prejudiced towards “Cardinals Baseball” in general.

    As last night’s drama unfolded I imagined a similar incident at either an NCSU or UNC sports venue during a “game” between the longtime rivals.   An incident in which a visiting player suffers an injury of unknown severity…..

    Allowing that the hardest of the hard-core partisans among you will immediately jump to defend the outstanding character of “your fans” and, at the same time, decry the sorry no-good nature of the hated rivals who, of course, are “all abuncha ______” as EVERYONE well knows.  ???

    I suspect there would be a regrettable smattering of jackassity evident within either home crowd.  As oft-stated on this website:

    Toenail fungus and jackass fans are, alas, among Life’s decidedly non-partisan realities.

    A more personal question is:  How would YOU react as a Home Team fan to a rival player’s severe injury?    At the end of the day, your behavior is all you are accountable for.

    baseball

    BobLee
    • Doug Reply
      4 years ago

      The first time I really understood how dangerous sport could be was when Tony Conigliaro was hit in the face by a pitch in 1967 at 22. No one that saw that or has seen similar devastating injuries (Joe Theismann) and celebrates it better pray that karma ain’t real.

      • BobLee Reply
        4 years ago

        “Normal people” understand that. “Normal people” don’t issue death threats to college chancellors for firing a football coach.

    • Rich Jones Reply
      4 years ago

      The Pittsburgh fans did respond appropriately, and they should be commended. But don’t break your arm patting yourself on the back. This is a common response at American fields and stadiums from the junior soccer to pro football – and I hope it continues to be common.

      Just this past weekend in St. Louis a Milwaukee player had a potential minor injury (nothing compared to the terrible collision last night), and when he got up walked off the field the St. Louis fans gave him a standing ovation as well.

      No matter how strong the rivalry, I hope our spirit of humanity always overrules the spirit of competition.

      • BobLee Reply
        4 years ago

        “…. Break my arm”??? … I hope you are correct about fan civility.

        • TheCowdog Reply
          4 years ago

          That Jones boy up there, is correct in my experience, but Mr. Jones, that did come off a might…abrasive.

          I don’t agree with the takes given below regarding Yank, Met, and Phillie fans.

          One question to the gallery. Have you ever been witness to the kind of play where you think “That dude is dead!”?

          If you have, you know all home fandromonium goes into the garbage pail

          • BobLee Reply
            4 years ago

            While I agree with the basic civility of my fellow man; I am concerned that the % of jackasses, while a minority, is ever-growing. “The Internet” breeds them with a false sense of anonymity and fuels their insane rage.

          • TheCowdog Reply
            4 years ago

            And you’re right, player to player, it’s different…once you realize the guy is really hurt.

            Depending on how bad, it may affect you for the rest of the game.

            Same with fans, I think.

            • BobLee
              4 years ago

              Last night, Peter Bourjos (the centerfielder involved in the collision) was replaced the next inning due to his emotional state. Pitchers getting hit w/ line drives usually get a universal response from both teams. I’m old enough to recall Herb Score and Gil McDougal’s line drive. 🙁

    • Tom Reply
      4 years ago

      I was in attendance at Wrigley Field 5-7 years ago. The Mets were in town and Tom Glavine was going for his 300th win. When he left in the 7th inning and the Met ahead 3-1, the Cubs fans gave him a standing ovation!

      • BobLee Reply
        4 years ago

        Was that meant as a back-handed compliment to Glavine for NOT getting #300?

    • Tom Jones Reply
      4 years ago

      Having lived in three major league cities I can tell you that Mets and Yankee fans along with Phillie fans would not behave as the classy Pittsburgh fans did. Twins fans would.

      Since Yogi passed, I heard a great story. Yogi and Whitey Ford were being interviewed, the interviewer asked Yogi “who was the best roommate you ever had while traveling” Yogi replied “Whitey Ford”‘ the interviewer turned to Whitey and asked the same question. Whitey replied “Angie Dickinson.”

      • BobLee Reply
        4 years ago

        Never heard that one !!! 🙂 … Angie is on my short list with Joey Heatherton and Ann-Margret.

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