JAY SMITH reminds us that ……

    Bonnie & Clyde
    BobLee
    March20/ 2016

    Jay SmithJay Smith a/k/a “notorious UNC faculty dissident” and co-author of CHEATED, recently posted a reminder of the timeline specifics of The Great Unpleasantness (TGU).

    Not exactly what March-Mad Tru-Blues want to be reminded of as Roys Boyz chase another banner.

    Those who have chosen to “not believe this stuff” for the past 4-5 years will likely continue to “not believe this stuff”.   “Not believing” helps that Carolina Way Kool-Aid go down a lot smoother. …. Conversely, for those on the other end of the very partisan teeter-totter it is fuel for the 24/7 bonfire….

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    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jay-m-smith/college-basketball-an-unhealthy-addiction_b_9463152.html

    THE BLOG

    College Basketball: An Unhealthy ‘Addiction’

    03/15/2016 12:45 pm ET | Updated 5 days ago

    Jay M. Smith
Historian of Europe, critic of university governance, advocate of educational access for athletes and all students.

    ASSOCIATED PRESS
    The return of March Madness has office pools humming. For decades, from the epic Magic and Bird final of 1979 to the era of the one-and-done’s, the nation’s appetite for college basketball has continued to grow. Buzzer beaters and Cinderellas and shining moments have created an “addictive” spectacle. Even president Obama eagerly fills out his brackets.

    Among the most serious costs of this national “addiction” is the hypocrisy it cultivates among the leaders of our public universities. Gate receipts, NCAA tournament bonuses, and the goodwill and fundraising advantages that allegedly accrue to schools with a successful basketball “brand” have led the stewards of universities to ignore or tacitly accept practices that directly conflict with the core missions of their institutions: to pursue truth and to educate tomorrow’s leaders.

    Take one of the top seeds in this year’s tournament, the North Carolina Tar Heels. We have learned much about the athletic-academic scandal uncovered at UNC between 2010 and 2015. We know that the fraud involved hundreds of classes and thousands of students. Faculty and administrators in many offices were complicit in the scam. They helped athletes enroll in notoriously soft courses across multiple departments. We know that many athletes stayed eligible for competition thanks to generous grades handed out in sham classes scheduled specifically for them. But a key detail about UNC’s experience with academic fraud has gone largely unnoticed — thanks to the university’s assiduous PR management and a strangely desultory NCAA investigation. The system of academic fraud cooked up around 1990 was initially intended to benefit one team in particular: the men’s basketball team.

    The first UNC course offered as a favor to the basketball team, scheduled in 1988, was an independent study for two painfully weak students who hovered at or below the eligibility line. They received helpful B’s, and out of that little experiment the UNC course scam was born. In fall 1992 one star of the basketball team ostensibly pursued an independent study with a faculty member who was on sabbatical at the time. (I know this because I shared a fellowship leave with that faculty member.) This had to have been one of the “shadow” courses offered by the administrative assistant who played such a central role in the fraud, a generous woman whose closest friend was the basketball team’s academic counselor. She assigned A or B grades in the shadow courses, which required no attendance and little work.

    One player on the 1993 team took seven suspect courses with her help; four starters on that team majored in the department where she worked. UNC’s 1993 championship run seems to have been aided and abetted by fraud.

    By 2005, when UNC won its next national championship, the “paper class” system (so called because students had to turn in only one paper of uncertain provenance to collect their A’s) was hitting on all cylinders. Players on the men’s basketball team took over one hundred of the fake courses, with one racking up eighteen. Star forward Rashad McCants has admitted that he rarely attended a single class in the spring of 2005 — even though he landed on the Dean’s list for the high grades he was awarded. Players on the 2009 national championship team received similar favors.

    UNC’s leaders first worked hard not to learn that men’s basketball had been the driver of the scandal and then refused to acknowledge that reality when the evidence for it was finally exposed. In a comical maneuver, they redacted the word “basketball” from emails they were forced to release to the public. When Rashad McCants spoke the truth about his academic experiences, the athletic department lined up former teammates to accuse him of fabricating tales. (McCants, tellingly, is the only player on the team willing to show the world his academic transcript, where the truth resides.)

    NOTE:  That no other UNC MBBer has come forward to reveal his transcript remains one of the most telling indictments of this scandal.  To do so could easily negate McCants’ claims. ….. but NADA.

    When the Kenneth Wainstein report of 2014 at last proved that the fraud scheme had been designed to keep athletes eligible, and that the worst abuses occurred during the basketball championship year of 2005, the university reacted by doubling down and handing coach Roy Williams a contract extension. Meanwhile, administrative leaders continue to urge the university community to “move forward” as the dithering NCAA enables UNC’s pursuit of another national title.

    The UNC case is of course only one symptom of a national disease. At Syracuse, officials pressured a professor to change a grade for the star center. At Florida State, players were handed answers to quizzes. At Michigan, administrators appeared to cover for an independent studies scam led by a faculty member with courtside seats. At UCLA, an advisor for the basketball team resigned in disgust when he claimed he saw a pattern of illicit grade changing.

    At Louisville, prostitutes and strippers were reportedly used to lure in talented high school players. Rather than call out this corruption and reassert the primacy of academic values, university presidents duck responsibility and cravenly feed the nation’s basketball “addiction”.

    Winning on the hard court, they have decided, is more important than integrity. We should all ponder the hypocrisy such leaders are modeling for today’s university students — the leaders of tomorrow — as we await the next tip-off.

    Jay M. Smith is a professor of history at UNC-Chapel Hill. He is the co-author, with Mary Willingham, of Cheated: The UNC Scandal, the Education of Athletes, and the Future of Big-Time College Sports.

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    Sort of Related …. A John Blake Update! LINK.

    Tags:
    BobLee
    • Doug Reply
      4 years ago

      Dean’s List takes on an entirely different meaning doesn’t it?
      I’m always seeking simple explanations to complicated situations. Help me because I know it can be simplified only so much. Am I generally correct in the following? TGU Part 1 (2010) was actually a culmination of something started back in the late 1980’s and was agent, runners/gophers FB coaches & players. Marvin Tweeted etc. TGU Part 2 (1988/90) is comprised of widespread systemic institutional (athletic,academic,administrative) command and control of schemes designed to maintain academic eligibility rather than academic success. I guess football (other sports too) looked at basketball and, like Meg Ryan in the movie When Harry Met Sally, said, ” I’ll have what they’re having.

      • BobLee Reply
        4 years ago

        IMO… the yuckiness that Marvin’s Tweet revealed had – IMO – been going on on a low-key level for awhile but more on a sporadic “everybody does it” level. Julius Peppers vs TA McLendon type shenanigans. Butch/Blake put “all that” on steroids when they arrived. What went on at UCLA in the 60-70s with Sam Gilbert that Wooden chose not to see. The “entitled perks” and “special admits” were escalated to standard SEC levels w/ Butch/Blake…
        .
        The Scheme for 18-20 years is another matter altogether. Nothing to even compare it to.

        • Doug Reply
          4 years ago

          Maybe Jay could fill us in on how eligibility of a one-and-done player is determined/managed. Football would seem to be the easiest to manage if a school wanted to facilitate it by being squishy on the rules for only 4 months. A player who enters school in late August and departs in December could theoretically never attend class and remain eligible. Am I wrong? A BB player could exit in March at the latest might be only slightly more complicated. Of course none of this would be an issue if schools were more concerned about graduating rather than keeping athletes eligible.

          • BobLee Reply
            4 years ago

            FBers can’t “go pro” after only one year. Can’t recall if its a 2 or 3 year minimum, probably two. Whatever he determines is “it” for him, he can then stop all pretense at some point. THIS is going to be an issue if the FB Playoffs start getting into the 2nd Semester of a school year. Star players who slack off in the Fall semester could be academically ineligible for playoffs in January. It already happens with some bowls.
            .
            With one/done BBkers, I think they only have to meet minimum eligibility levels for their one Fall semester. They know they are going to drop-out after their team’s final game (as Simmons just did). Simmons made a mockery of the whole process at LSU this year.
            .
            “Schools” may pretend to care about graduating but coaches only care about Ws and star players only care about “going pro ASAP”.

    • MattN Reply
      4 years ago

      One of the things I never see much about with TGU is the collateral damage. The careers that have been ruined. Ask Mike O’Cain or Herb Sendek if they could have done what UNC did, would they have won a few more recruiting battles, a few more games, and still be coaching today? Ask people like Beth Bridger, who simply did the job they were hired to do, how this is working out for them. Also, let’s say UNC loses a few research grants due to accreditation being placed on probation. You think the general assembly is going to allow UNC alone to shoulder that financial burded? Hell no, they’re going to take it out of the other schools’ budgets. And that might mean firing some good, yet expensive, professors. The CW wineos see it as nothing more than maybe a few undeserved wins and tapestries. It’s WAY more than that. Lives and careers have been irreversibly damaged. That’s at a minimum as bad as an A in a class thst didn’t exist.

      • BobLee Reply
        4 years ago

        Throw a brick in the middle of a lake and the ripples travel all the way to the shore. The 18+ years of this Scheme did involve a lot of people in various ways. If you EVER expect the average UNC Holocaust-Denier to ever agree with your observation (or even admit to the charges) you have a long wait. The NCAA verdict is not going to change any minds on any of this.
        .
        The Carolina Way is still “a religion” to a great many people who otherwise appear rational.

    • Jay Reply
      4 years ago

      BobLee–for what it’s worth, I’d just like to point out–having just read the comments for the blog post–that one of your commenters repeats a widely help misconception, which is that the NCAA came back to UNC “only after the Wainstein report was released.” Not true. The NCAA had announced the reopening of the investigation back at the end of June 2014. It seems to me that two things forced their hand: 1) KW was collecting info and sharing it with them already, probably since March, and 2) Rashad McCants came out in early June.

      They knew there was no way they could continue to ignore the Chapel Hill cesspool. The evidence made public by KW in October was icing on the cake. (Strange metaphor mixing there.) -Jay

      • BobLee Reply
        4 years ago

        Thanks Jay. 🙂

    • thailand Reply
      4 years ago

      It seems only yesterday that Anson Dorrance and Bill Palladino were kidding me about Chris Corchiani selling his shoes and game tickets…..Remember kicking a soccer ball around with little Mia one afternoon over at Fetzer Field…..Fun/pleasant days with fond memories along with the good-natured ribbing from my two friends.
      ____________________________________________________________
      Wonder if little Mia received a “world-class education”, or maintained eligibility through “unpleasant” maneuvering……Carolina graduates, particularly the athletes who graduate face the caveat of suspicion, a kind of affirmative action side-effect and that is, of course, unfortunate for the serious academic…..
      _____________________________________________________________
      Going back to 1990 brings in the deified it would seem……
      ________________________________________________________

      If Carolina wins the NCAA Championship, would it even compare with the ’57 Title, or am a I drifting romantic of the “yusta days”? 🙂
      ____________________________________________________________
      Gearing up for a trip to the states in April….. Happy Easter
      ____________________________________________________________
      From Pattaya

      • BobLee Reply
        4 years ago

        All of this is uncharted waters. How “it” might affect decades of athletes / alums is impossible to project. There will ALWAYS be Holocaust Deniers thats for sure.

    • Porgie Reply
      4 years ago

      I forwarded this article to a senior editor at Kiplinger Magazine with whom I have challenged in a series of emails as to why a certain university was even considered in their rankings of colleges. “Very sad” was the response.

      • BobLee Reply
        4 years ago

        I’m not sure the academic community on a national level has paid all that much attention to all this.

        • wolflove Reply
          4 years ago

          Agreed. As many say, and rightfully so, it’s going on everywhere. Although at different levels. point is they all want it swept under the rug including those like US NEWS AND WORLD REPORT who don’t want anyone messing with their best seller every year. That trash about which colleges are better than others.

          • BobLee Reply
            4 years ago

            Not sure USNWR has any skin in this. Whoever pays attention to their rankings for whatever reasons they do will always have lots of other schools to rank.

    • SWVA UNCer Reply
      4 years ago

      Perhaps Wolflove was savoring “wishful thinking” while enjoying his red Kool-Aid. Oh well, to each his own. I just wish some Pack fans would realize these kids were not even there during the TGU era.

      • BobLee Reply
        4 years ago

        There has always been much Kool-Aid drinking on all sides.

      • wolflove Reply
        4 years ago

        now this is what I was writing about. Another CB kool-aid drinker that can’t see the forest for the trees. Do you think I really think I’m going to win publishers clearing house? Of course you do. And who cares whose playing now. If you really care about “the kids” then how about all the kids that were cheated that had the misfortune of playing against a college where the administration approved the cheating that we all KNOW happened.

        • SWVA UNCer Reply
          4 years ago

          I’m not a CB Kool-Aid drinker, never have, and never will be. I know what happened, because I was there during part of those years. BobLee be the first person to tell you that. I just think it’s time to stop blaming the current group of kids for past mistakes.These kids have lived under the taunts of UNCheat and every other nasty thing the opposition could say about them their entire four years in college. They deserve a break, and quite frankly, so do the fans who were horrified at what happened in the past. If you enjoy relishing in the past, be my guest. But I don’t. If NC State was playing under the same circumstances, I would definitely be pulling for the kids in red. And, as much as I despise Coach K, I also hope his team has a good run this year. It’s good for the conference, and his young kids deserve it. Have a great day.

          • Dr.Vinnyboombatz Reply
            4 years ago

            The UNIVERSITY has to be sanctioned for what was done in the past. With this TGU eligibility fraud going on from 1989-2011 or longer, many employees of UNC had to know it existed. Almost all of them either condoned it or were willing to look the other way whenever it was noticed or discussed. The current players on the team chose to come play at UNC even though TGU was exposed. The PR efforts along with high school students generally lacking interest in current events, helped them to choose UNC despite TGU and it’s cloud over Chapel Hill.Therefore, moaning about the current kids on the team being innocent is to quote Ole Roy, “HORSE$H!+.

            • BobLee
              4 years ago

              I “blame” a lot of this on the NCAA judicial process. “Fact-gathering” does not need to take 3-4 years. Yes… a verdict that imposes sanctions on recruiting / post season play et al will not affect the players / coaches that directly benefitted from the scheme, but will affect current players. The admins directly involved are all long gone with their fat pensions… which, IMO, is the highest crime of all. I don’t have a solution other than a greatly expedited investigation / ruling process.

            • Dr.Vinnyboombatz
              4 years ago

              Actually in this case the NCAA is going faster than normal. They only decided to investigate the academic fraud part of TGU AFTER Wainstein released his report in October of 2014. So, if the expected May ruling occurs the we are talking 19 months total. Most that follow this TGU thing equate its beginning to the Marvin tweet on 2010. That investigation ended with a football only wrist slap 4 years ago.Of course this site and the message boards bridged the two investigations together for the 19 months between them. This was kept in the news mainly by the PJ Hairston issues which NEVER attracted an investigation by the NCAA( which was a mistake on their part).

            • BobLee
              4 years ago

              Which explains the “G” in TGU. Separate issues but all under the shadow of The Old Well. I might elevate the penalties for Butch/BlakeMess beyond “wrist-slap”… key player / coach dismissals, recruiting sanctions and a missed bowl ?? All certainly VERY well deserved and above “wrist-slap” level.

          • wolflove Reply
            4 years ago

            It’s not the past. It only seems like the past because the adults, the UNC administration, lied and spent so much time covering it up or trying to that it’s still ongoing. I root for all ACC teams. This still falls back to the forest and trees symptom.

    • WolfLove Reply
      4 years ago

      First to Comment! Just joking.

      Well the The Huffington is not allowing comments and too bad as I love to read all the CB Kool-Aid drinkers try and defend the indefensible and write how it is just that all the losers are jealous. Never seems to resonate that the winners, which they are obviously claiming to be in this scenario, did so by cheating at unrepresented levels while claiming to be squeaky clean. Really a good ploy I guess as it worked for more than two decades and would have continued working if it was kept in basketball as intended.

      • BobLee Reply
        4 years ago

        If only Marvin had never hit SEND …..

        • WolfLove Reply
          4 years ago

          True. Or if he would just go ahead and spill them beans! 2nd… I’m getting lots of email from Publishers Clearing house so it seems I am about to win $10,000 a week for life and UNC is going to get the death penalty

        • Dr.Vinnyboombatz Reply
          4 years ago

          Yes, things would be much different if Marvin never hit send.
          The “Carolina way” would be more believable to those not intoxicated on light blue koolade.
          Roy could have gotten some more “One and done” type recruits away from Calipari and Coach K.
          To stretch it just a bit, Fatz Thomas could run for Governor.
          Any other ideas as to how things would have been different without Marvin using his Twitter account?

          • BobLee Reply
            4 years ago

            IMO… The Butcher would still be gone… bolting for a Big Buck SEC gig and taking Blake (Who?) along with him. Larry Fedora would be in either the Big 12 or SEC. Dickie would likely have retired by now with his mega-fat pension and replaced by a “member of the Carolina Family” probably Rick Steinbacher. Holden would be Chancellor. Chihuahua would likely have left Dartmouth for someplace other than UNCCH.
            .
            Roy would still be a certified “loose cannon” because that is what he is. All the State and Carolina fans who must interact socially and professionally would still be pissin’ & moaning at one another over “whatever”.

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